Masthead banner of Park Science: Integrating Research and Resource Management in the National Parks; ISSN 1090-9966; link to current issue
Volume 26
Number 1
Spring 2009
Arrowhead symbol of the National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior
Home + About + Author Guidelines + Archive + Subscribe +  
Map of Canada showing grizzly bear management case study sites. (Cartography by Douglas Clark) Social / Cultural Sciences
Societal dynamics in grizzly bear conservation: Vulnerabilities of the ecosystem-based management approach
By Douglas Clark
Published: 15 Jan 2014 (online)  •  30 Jan 2014 (in print)
Pages
 
Abstract
  Introduction
Results
What do these findings mean for parks?
References
About the author
+ PDF +
Introduction

CONSERVING GRIZZLY BEAR POPULATIONS is a significant challenge for wildlife managers throughout North America. Much fruitful research has been conducted on the biology of grizzlies, but how to craft policies that will surface to conserve grizzlies at biologically meaningful spatial scales remains poorly understood. This task, which demands interjurisdictional cooperation in complex and varied social contexts (e.g., Herrero 1994; Herrero et al. 2001; Mattson et al. 1996), can create conflicts between management agencies and local residents that can jeopardize ecosystem management and planning programs—programs that often feature grizzlies as key components (Clark and Slocombe 2005; Primm and Murray 2005). Broadly, the goal of this study was to understand how and why such conflicts occur. I used qualitative data analysis and case study methods (Miles and Huberman 1994; Yin 2003) and the policy sciences’ interdisciplinary problem analysis framework (Clark 2002) to analyze and compare four case studies of grizzly bear management in Canada (fig. 1):

1. Foothills Model Forest (FMF), Alberta (including Jasper National Park)

2. Southwestern Yukon Territory (including Kluane National Park)

3. North slope of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR), Northwest Territories and Yukon Territory (including Ivvavik National Park)

4. Baker Lake, Nunavut (no park nearby)

Using established and culturally appropriate interview methods (Huntington 1998), I conducted 59 interviews with decision makers and stakeholders at these four sites from 2003 to 2005. Working with the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations in the southwestern Yukon, we held a series of focus groups to investigate bear management in detail. Using HyperResearch software (http://www.researchware.com), I transcribed and coded all recorded material for analysis. My interpretation of results was enriched by 12 years of experience working for Parks Canada, including two years of involvement with grizzly bear management in Kluane National Park. The views and conclusions expressed are my own and do not necessarily reflect the perspectives of the U.S. National Park Service, Parks Canada, or any other organization mentioned.

“Much fruitful research has been conducted on the biology of grizzlies, but how to craft policies that will suffice to conserve grizzlies at biologically meaningful spatial scales remains poorly understood.”

Return to top

This page updated:  13 July 2009
URL: http://www.nature.nps.gov/ParkScience/index.cfm?ArticleID=290&Page=1



Page 1 of 5 • Next +
Departments
 
From the Guest Editor(s)
In This Issue
Information Crossfile
Book Reviews
Masthead Information
FEATURES
 
The Canon National Parks Science Scholars Program: A legacy of science for national parks
Science for parks / parks for science: Conservation-based research in national parks
The rock and ice problem in national parks: An opportunity for monitoring climate change impacts
1,000 feet above a coral reef: A seascape approach to designing marine protected areas
Management strategies for keystone bird species: The Magellanic woodpecker in Nahuel Huapi National Park, Argentina
Climate change and water supply in western national parks
Mercury in snow at Acadia National Park reveals watershed dynamics
Organic pollutant distribution in Canadian mountain parks
Building an NPS training program in interpretation through distance learning
Musical instruments in the pre-Hispanic Southwest
  Societal dynamics in grizzly bear conservation: Vulnerabilities of the ecosystem-based management approach
Linking wildlife populations with ecosystem change: State-of-the-art satellite ecology for national-park science
Whale sound recording technology as a tool for assessing the effects of boat noise in a Brazilian marine park
Related Publications + Explore Nature + NPS.gov + Privacy + Disclaimer + Contact Editor
Web Site Last Updated: 17 January 2014