Masthead banner of Park Science: Integrating Research and Resource Management in the National Parks; ISSN 1090-9966; link to current issue
Volume 25
Number 1
Summer 2008
Arrowhead symbol of the National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior
Home + About + Author Guidelines + Archive + Subscribe +  
Swamp and great egret, Everglades National Park, Florida. Research Report
Adaptive management for natural parks: Considerations for an experimental approach
By Tony Prato
Published: 15 Jan 2014 (online)  •  30 Jan 2014 (in print)
Pages
 
Abstract
  Introduction
Nature of adaptive management
User capacity example
Adaptive management under risk
Adaptive management under uncertainty
Conclusion
References
About the author
+ PDF +
Introduction

The concept of adaptive management was developed in the mid-1970s as a means to account for uncertainty in the way ecosystems respond to human intervention (Holling 1978; Walters 1996). Adaptive management postulates that “if human understanding of nature is imperfect, then human interactions with nature [e.g., management actions] should be experimental” (Lee 1993). Kohm and Franklin (1997) state that “adaptive management is the only logical approach under the circumstances of uncertainty and the continued accumulation of knowledge.” Adaptive management improves understanding of ecosystem responses to human interventions, such as management actions, and promotes shared understanding of ecosystems by stakeholders, scientists, policymakers, and managers. The methods used to apply adaptive management to national parks are often site- and problem-specific (see examples below), which makes it difficult for park managers to use them in other park units. In this article, I propose a generic analytical framework for adaptively managing natural and cultural resources and visitors to national parks and other protected areas.

Adaptive management improves understanding of ecosystem responses to human interventions, such as management actions, and promotes shared understanding of ecosystems by stakeholders, scientists, policymakers, and managers.

Return to top

This page updated:  5 August 2008
URL: http://www.nature.nps.gov/ParkScience/index.cfm?ArticleID=220&Page=1



Page 1 of 8 • Next +
Departments
 
From the Editor
In This Issue
Comments and Corrections
20 Years Ago in Park Science
Information Crossfile
Profile
Tribute
Science Notes
Field Moment
Meetings of Interest
Masthead Information
FEATURES
 
The decline of elkhorn coral at Buck Island Reef National Monument
Basic ecology of elkhorn coral and threats to its survival
Assessing the effects of ungulates on natural resources at Assateague Island National Seashore
Saving the seabeach amaranth
Collaboration of the Natural Resource and Museum programs: A research tool for information archives at Dinosaur National Monument
Using virtual Research Learning Centers for disseminating science information about national park resources
Using landscape analysis to evaluate ecological impacts of battlefield restoration
A behavioral intervention tool for recreation managers
  Adaptive management for natural parks: Considerations for an experimental approach
Cultivating connection: Incorporating meaningful citizen science into Cape Cod National Seashore’s estuarine research and monitoring programs
Ranking and mapping exotic species at Capulin Volcano and Fort Union national monuments
Related Publications + Explore Nature + NPS.gov + Privacy + Disclaimer + Contact Editor
Web Site Last Updated: 17 January 2014