For the more information about the geologic resources of the National Park Service, please visit http://www.nature.nps.gov/geology/.


Wood Thrush (Hylochichla mustelina)

Wood Thrush
Wood Thrush. Photo by USFWS/Steve Maslowski.

This common songbird has become a symbol of the decline of neotropical songbirds in North America. "Neotropical" refers to birds that winter in Central or South America or the Caribbean, and that breed in the United States or Canada. More than 300 North American bird species are neotropical migrants. Wood Thrush can be seen in many eastern United States national parks.

Since 1966, the Wood Thrush has declined by 43 percent. A contributing factor is forest fragmentation on both breeding and wintering grounds. It is also likely that acid rain has lessened the availability of calcium-rich prey, thereby reducing egg production. Currently, little is known about the importance of migratory stop-over sites and their effects on Wood Thrush decline.


The Journey

Wood Thrush fly between 500 to 2,000 feet (152–610 m) high and travel at night. Their nocturnal journey allows them to take advantage of calmer air, cooler temperatures, and less active predators. Their journey takes them from summer breeding grounds in the eastern United States to wintering grounds in Mexico and Central America, a trek of some 1250 miles (2000 km).

Map of wood thrush migration.
Map of Wood Thrush migration.



National Parks

Wood thrush use these and other national parks:

Acadia National Park Cuyahoga Valley National Park George Washington Birthplace National Monument
Acadia
National Park
Cuyahoga Valley
National Park
George Washington Birthplace
National Monument
     
Gettysburg National Military Park Great Smoky Mountains National Park Shenandoah National Park
Gettysburg
National Military Park
Great Smoky Mountains
National Park
Shenandoah
National Park

Last Updated: December 21, 2010