For the more information about the geologic resources of the National Park Service, please visit http://www.nature.nps.gov/geology/.


Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae)

Humpback Whale
Humpback whale. Photo by NOAA.

The migratory baleen humpback whale swims through all the oceans of the world. During the 20th century, hunting reduced humpback populations by more than ninety percent.

The humpback whale was classified as an endangered species in 1973 when the United States Endangered Species Act was passed. Although humpback populations are recovering, threats such as collisions with ships, entanglement in fishing gear, hunting, and noise pollution persist.


The Journey

Humpback whales migrate 5,000 miles (8,000 km), one of the longest migrations of any mammal. Humpbacks feed during the summer in sub arctic regions and travel to sub-tropical waters in winter to breed.

Map of humpback whale migration.
Map of humpback whale migration.



National Parks

Humpback whales use these and other national parks:

Channel Islands National Park Fire Island National Seashore Glacier Bay National Park
Channel Islands
National Park
Fire Island
National Seashore
Glacier Bay
National Park
     
Haleakala National Park Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Olympic National Park
Haleakala
National Park
Hawaii Volcanoes
National Park
Olympic
National Park

Last Updated: December 17, 2010