Explore Air

Acid Rain Lesson Plan

Activity 3 - Understanding what Gasses Contribute to Acid Rain

Time: 1 hour

Behavioral Objectives

At the end of this lesson the student will be able to:

  1. Name two gases which significantly increase acidity in rainfall and give two naturally occurring sources of these gases and two manmade sources of these gases.
  2. Tell how surface water (runoff, streams, lakes) may already be acidic, even before any acid rain reaches it.

Materials

You will need:

  1. Writing paper
  2. Pencils
  3. Figure 5a, teacher's copy
  4. Figure 5b, one copy per student
  5. Markers: Orange, red, green, blue

Instructions to Teacher

  1. Describe to students how acid rain is formed and primary control measures. Refer to "Background Information", 3.1 to 3.6 and 4.1 to 4.5.
  2. Have students fill in Figure 5b, labeling the illustration as called for in the list below the figure. Color the four major areas: orange for source, red for formation, green for land, and blue for water.
  3. Have students write two to three paragraphs on how the United States is cutting down the amount of SO2 and NOx emissions put into the air each year.

Instructions to Students

  1. On the picture given to you by your teacher, put the items listed (1 to 12) on the picture in their proper place. Remember where the gases come from, where they mix with water, and where the acid rain returns to earth.
  2. Color in these three main areas: where the gases come from, where they mix, and where they return. Write two or three paragraphs on how the United States is cutting down on the amount of SO2 and NOx emissions put into the air each year.

Questions to Students

  1. Where might acids form in the atmosphere? (Fog, smog, clouds)
  2. Name two manmade sources and two natural sources of SO2 and NOx.

updated on 04/20/2006  I   http://www.nature.nps.gov/air/edu/Lessons/Activity3.cfm   I  Email: Webmaster